Daily Health Headlines

Hysterectomy

👤by MedicineNet.com 0 comments 🕔Friday, February 21st, 2014

A hysterectomy is a surgical procedure whereby the uterus (womb) is removed. This surgery for women is the most common non-obstetrical procedure in the United States.

How common is hysterectomy?

Approximately 300 out of every 100,000 women will undergo a hysterectomy.

Why is a hysterectomy performed?

The most common reason hysterectomy is performed is for uterine fibroids. Other common reasons are:

abnormal uterine bleeding (vaginal bleeding), cervical dysplasia (pre-cancerous conditions of the cervix), endometriosis, and uterine prolapse (including pelvic relaxation).

Only 10% of hysterectomies are performed for cancer. This article will primarily focus on the use of hysterectomy for non-cancerous, non-emergency reasons, which can involve even more challenging decisions for women and their doctors.

Uterine fibroids (also known as uterine leiomyomata) are by far the most common reason a hysterectomy is performed. Uterine fibroids are benign growths of the uterus, the cause of which is unknown. Although the vast majority are benign, meaning they do not cause or turn into cancer, uterine fibroids can cause medical problems. Indications for hysterectomy in cases of uterine fibroids are excessive size (usually greater than the size of an eight month pregnancy), pressure or pain, and/or bleeding severe enough to produce anemia. Pelvic relaxation is another condition that can require treatment with a hysterectomy. In this condition, a woman experiences a loosening of the support muscles and tissues in the pelvic floor area. Mild relaxation can cause first degree prolapse, in which the cervix (the uterine opening) is about halfway down into the vagina. In second degree prolapse, the cervix or leading edge of the uterus has moved to the vaginal opening, and in third degree prolapse, the cervix and uterus protrude past the vaginal opening. Second and third degree uterine prolapse must be treated with hysterectomy. A loosening, vaginal wall weakness such as a cystocele, rectocele, or urethrocele, can lead to symptoms such as urinary incontinence (unintentional loss of urine), pelvic heaviness, and impaired sexual performance. The urine loss tends to be aggravated by sneezing, coughing, jumping, or laughing. Childbearing is probably involved in increasing the risk for pelvic relaxation, though the exact reasons remain unclear. Avoidance of vaginal birth and having a caesarean section doesn't necessarily reduce the risk of developing pelvic relaxation.

A hysterectomy is also performed to treat uterine cancer or very severe pre-cancers (called dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, or CIN III, or microinvasive carcinoma of the cervix). A hysterectomy for endometrial cancer (uterine lining cancer) has an obvious purpose, that of removal of the cancer from the body. This procedure is the foundation of treatment for cancer of the uterus.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/21/2014

Hysterectomy Index Find a Local Doctor

Patient Comments Viewers share their comments

Hysterectomy - Describe Your Experience Question: Please describe your Hysterectomy experience.

Hysterectomy - Treatments Question: What tests or treatments were performed before your hysterectomy?

Hysterectomy - Recovery Question: What was the recovery time for your hysterectomy?

Medical Author:

Suzanne R Trupin, MD

Dr. Suzanne Trupin is a Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University Of Illinois College Of Medicine at Urbana-Champaign. She graduated from Stanford University and completed her medical training at New York Medical in Valhalla, New York. She received her residency training at the University of Southern California Women's Hospital in Los Angeles, California. She is Board-Certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Medical Editor:

Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Hysterectomy and Pap Smears

Medical Author: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MDMedical Editor: William C. Shiel, Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

Viewer Question: Is it necessary to have a Pap smear if you have had a hysterectomy?

Dr. Stöppler's Answer: In some types of hysterectomy, the entire uterus is removed, including the cervix (the opening to the uterus). If you have had your cervix removed, you usually won't need to have regular Pap smears. In other types of hysterectomies, the cervix is left intact, and the portion of the uterus above the cervix is removed. In this case, the cervix is still present and Pap smears are still required.

Article Credits / Source

MedicineNet.com

MedicineNet.com provides up to the minute breaking health news. Click here to view this full article from MedicineNet.com.

View More Articles From MedicineNet.com 🌎View Article Website

Sponsored Product

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

People who have trouble sleeping typically have low levels of melatonin, so melatonin supplements seem like a logical fix for insomnia. There is a high demand for sleep aids, especially in the U.S. The National Health Interview Survey done in 2002, and again in 2007, found 1.6 million US adults were using complementary and alternative sleep aids for insomnia. Lunar Sleep was a top choice. Use Promo Code: Sleep2014 and only pay $1.95 S&H.

Get Lunar Sleep for $1.95

More Women's Health Articles

'Yo-Yo Dieting' Hard on Older Women's Hearts: Study

'Yo-Yo Dieting' Hard on Older Women's Hearts: Study0

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of Americans have a lifelong struggle with their waistlines -- dieting, losing weight, but then gaining it back again. It's a pattern known as "yo-yo dieting," and a new study suggests it ...

norethindrone (oral - Camila, Errin, Heather, Jencycla, Nor QD, Nora-BE, Ortho Micronor, Incassia)

norethindrone (oral - Camila, Errin, Heather, Jencycla, Nor QD, Nora-BE, Ortho Micronor, Incassia)0

home / women's health center / women's health a-z list / norethindrone-oral contraceptive index / norethindrone (oral - camila, errin, heather, jencycla, nor qd, nora-be, ortho micronor, incassia) drug ...

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)0

Menstrual cramps are not the same as the symptoms experienced due to premenstrual syndrome (PMS), although the symptoms of both disorders can sometimes be experienced together. Treatment options vary and each woman needs to find a treatment that works ...

Self-Exam of Breast Should Be Thorough

Self-Exam of Breast Should Be Thorough0

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There are five steps women should follow to ensure a monthly breast self-exam is effective, an expert says. "The most important thing about a breast self-examination is to know your breasts," said Dr. ...

Women Brace for Changes to Health Benefits

Women Brace for Changes to Health Benefits0

By Brenda Goodman, MA Reviewed by Sarah Goodell Nov. 11, 2016 -- For some women, the election results are getting personal. Both President-elect Donald Trump and congressional leaders have promised to overturn ...

View More Women's Health Articles

0 Comments

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Our Mailing List

Subscribe to our mailing list to get the latest health news as it breaks!

Your information will not be shared with anyone!