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Syphilis In Women

👤by MedicineNet.com 0 comments 🕔Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

Syphilis facts

Syphilis is a bacterial infection that is transmitted by sexual contact. Condoms do not necessarily prevent sexually transmitted diseases. The scientific name for the syphilis organism is Treponema pallidum. Early syphilis causes a mouth or genital ulcer (chancre). This is the hallmark symptom of the first stage. Later stages of syphilis can cause hair loss, headaches, sore throat, and skin rash. Eventually, syphilis can lead to heart and brain damage. The standard screening blood tests for syphilis are called the Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) and Rapid Plasminogen Reagent (RPR) tests. These detect the response to infection. Any positive VDRL or RPR test must be confirmed by a test specific for the organism causing syphilis, such as the microhemagglutination assay for T. pallidum (MHA-TP) and the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorbed test (FTA-ABS). Syphilis is treated with antibiotics. Women who are infected during pregnancy can pass on the infection to the fetus through the placenta.

What are sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)?

Picture of syphilis

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that can be transferred from one person to another through any type of sexual contact. STDs are sometimes referred to as sexually transmitted infections (STIs) since they involve the transmission of a disease-causing organism from one person to another during sexual activity. It is important to realize that sexual contact includes more than just sexual intercourse (vaginal and anal). Sexual contact includes kissing, oral-genital contact, and the use of sexual "toys," such as vibrators. STDs have been around for thousands of years, but the most dangerous of these conditions, the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), has only been recognized since 1984.

Many STDs are treatable, but effective cures are lacking for others, such as HIV, HPV, and hepatitis B and C. Even gonorrhea, once easily cured, has become resistant to many of the older traditional antibiotics. Many STDs can be present in, and spread by, people who do not have any symptoms of the condition and have not yet been diagnosed with an STD. Therefore, public awareness and education about these infections and the methods of preventing them is important.

There really is no such thing as "safe" sex. The only truly effective way to prevent STDs is abstinence. Sex in the context of a monogamous relationship wherein neither party is infected with a STD also is considered "safe." Most people think that kissing is a safe activity. Unfortunately, syphilis, herpes, and other infections can be contracted through this relatively simple and apparently harmless act. All other forms of sexual contact carry some risk. Condoms are commonly thought to protect against STDs. Condoms are useful in decreasing the spread of certain infections, such as Chlamydia and gonorrhea; however, they do not fully protect against other infections such as genital herpes, genital warts, syphilis, and AIDS. Prevention of the spread of STDs is dependent upon the counseling of at-risk individuals and the early diagnosis and treatment of infections.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 3/4/2014

Patient Comments Viewers share their comments

Syphilis In Women - Symptoms Question: What were your Syphilis symptoms?

Syphilis In Women - Diagnosis Question: Please describe the tests and exams that led to a diagnosis of syphilis.

Syphilis In Women - Treatment Question: What forms of treatment, including medication, did you receive for syphilis?

Syphilis In Women Summary Syphilis, a sexually transmitted disease, is caused by a microscopic, wormlike bacterial organism called a spirochete. There are three stages of syphilis. The first involves the formation of the chancre. The second stage often includes hair loss, a sore throat, white patches in the nose, mouth, and vagina, fever, headaches, and a skin rash. The third stage can cause extensive damage to the internal organs and the brain, and can lead to death. Though early infection often resolves on its own, treatment usually varies based on the stage of the infection at the time of diagnosis.

Medical Author:

Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Medical Editor:

William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

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