Daily Health Headlines

Your Biological Clock: Why Some Age Faster Than Others

👤by Robert Preidt 0 comments 🕔Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some adults age faster biologically than others, and may die early even if they have healthy lifestyles, researchers report.

The international team of scientists analyzed DNA in blood samples from more than 13,000 people in the United States and Europe and used an "epigenetic clock" to predict their life spans.

The clock calculates the aging of blood and other tissues by tracking a natural process (methylation) that chemically alters DNA over time, the researchers explained.

"We discovered that 5 percent of the population ages at a faster biological rate, resulting in a shorter life expectancy," said principal investigator Steve Horvath. He is a professor of human genetics and biostatistics at the University of California, Los Angeles.

"Accelerated aging increases these adults' risk of death by 50 percent at any age," Horvath added in a university news release.

"While a healthful lifestyle may help extend life expectancy, our innate aging process prevents us from cheating death forever," he said. "Yet risk factors like smoking, diabetes and high blood pressure still predict mortality more strongly than one's epigenetic aging rate."

The study was published Sept. 28 in the journal Aging.

"We were stunned to see that the epigenetic clock was able to predict the lifespans of Caucasians, Hispanics and African-Americans," said study first author Brian Chen, a postdoctoral fellow at the U.S. National Institute on Aging.

"This rang true even after adjusting for traditional risk factors like age, gender, smoking, body mass index, disease history and blood cell counts," Chen added.

Horvath said the research appears to reveal valuable clues into what causes human aging. This marks "a first step toward developing targeted methods to slow the process," he added.

The preliminary findings may help explain why some adults die young even if they have a nutritious diet, get regular exercise, don't smoke and drink little or no alcohol.

Larger studies are needed to help scientists tease out the relationship between biological age and specific diseases, the study authors added.

-- Robert Preidt

Article Credits / Source

Robert Preidt / HealthDay

Robert Preidt wrote this story for HealthDay. HealthDay provides up to the minute breaking health news. Click here to view this full article from HealthDay.

SOURCE: University of California, Los Angeles, news release, Sept. 28, 2016

View More Articles From Robert Preidt 🌎View Article Website

Sponsored Product

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

People who have trouble sleeping typically have low levels of melatonin, so melatonin supplements seem like a logical fix for insomnia. There is a high demand for sleep aids, especially in the U.S. The National Health Interview Survey done in 2002, and again in 2007, found 1.6 million US adults were using complementary and alternative sleep aids for insomnia. Lunar Sleep was a top choice. Use Promo Code: Sleep2014 and only pay $1.95 S&H.

Get Lunar Sleep for $1.95

More Senior Health Articles

Palliative Care Raises Quality of Life, But Doesn't Extend It

Palliative Care Raises Quality of Life, But Doesn't Extend It0

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Palliative care can ease the burden that a serious illness places on both a patient and loved ones, but there's no evidence that it can extend the life of a sick person, a review of the available evidence has ...

1 in 4 Seniors Doesn't Discuss End-of-Life Care

1 in 4 Seniors Doesn't Discuss End-of-Life Care0

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-quarter of American seniors have never discussed end-of-life care, a new study finds. "Despite decades of work to improve advance care planning, over a quarter of older adults have still ...

Clots May Be the Cause of Fainting in Some Elderly

Clots May Be the Cause of Fainting in Some Elderly0

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When elderly adults suffer a fainting spell, a blood clot in the lungs may be the culprit more often than doctors have realized, a new study suggests. Italian researchers found that among 560 ...

Better Way to Treat Seniors' Ankle Fractures?

Better Way to Treat Seniors' Ankle Fractures?0

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of plaster cast might help older adults avoid surgery for unstable ankle fractures, researchers say. "Older adults -- those over 60 -- are suffering an increasing number of ankle fractures ...

Seniors With Hip Fractures Fare Better in Large Teaching Hospitals: Study

Seniors With Hip Fractures Fare Better in Large Teaching Hospitals: Study0

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors with hip fractures may be more likely to die if they're treated in smaller community hospitals than in large teaching hospitals, a new Canadian study suggests. About 10 percent of hip fracture ...

View More Senior Health Articles


Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Our Mailing List

Subscribe to our mailing list to get the latest health news as it breaks!

Your information will not be shared with anyone!