Daily Health Headlines

Too Few Female Urologists to Meet Aging Patients' Demand

👤by Robert Preidt 0 comments 🕔Monday, August 22nd, 2016

MONDAY, Aug. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women prefer to see female urologists, but there are far too few to meet a growing demand, a new study reports.

Researchers analyzed patient data from 2003 to 2012 for more than 6,000 urologists across the United States. Women represented 54 percent of patients for female urologists, and 32 percent for male urologists, the study found.

Of an estimated 9,600 U.S. urologists, between 8 percent and 12 percent are women, according to the study.

"Every day in my practice I hear women say, 'Oh, I'm so glad you're here. It has taken me a long time to find a woman in this field,'" said study senior author Dr. Sarah Flury. She is an assistant professor of urology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine.

"In some smaller cities, there isn't a single female urologist," Flury said.

The number of female urologists did increase from 34 in 1981 to 512 in 2009, and the percentage of female urology residents rose from 5 percent in 1989 to 23 percent in 2011.

"The field has been lacking in gender equality," Flury said in a university news release. "There is an unmet need."

As they age, more women are seeing urologists, and a main reason is incontinence. The stigma around the condition has eased, and more women are seeking treatment for it, the researchers explained.

The study's lead author, Dr. Daniel Oberlin, chief urology resident at Feinberg, said, "In many medical specialties there is a discrepancy between men and women in the field, but urology has one of the largest gender disparities."

The study looked particularly at gender-neutral surgeries -- procedures that are not specific to men or women. It found that female urologists perform a larger share of these surgeries on female patients than male urologists do.

"We often assume that a physician's training, experience and expertise may influence the type of patients they treat, yet this is the first time we have shown that a surgeon's gender alone will shape the gender of patients they see in clinic," Oberlin said in the news release.

More women must be encouraged to pursue urology, he added. "The misconception is urology tends to deal with male issues, but we deal with the kidneys, bladder and entire urinary tract -- a lot of organs that affect women," Oberlin said.

The report was published online recently in the Journal of Urology.

-- Robert Preidt

Article Credits / Source

Robert Preidt / HealthDay

Robert Preidt wrote this story for HealthDay. HealthDay provides up to the minute breaking health news. Click here to view this full article from HealthDay.

SOURCE: Northwestern University, news release, Aug. 17, 2016

View More Articles From Robert Preidt 🌎View Article Website

Sponsored Product

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

People who have trouble sleeping typically have low levels of melatonin, so melatonin supplements seem like a logical fix for insomnia. There is a high demand for sleep aids, especially in the U.S. The National Health Interview Survey done in 2002, and again in 2007, found 1.6 million US adults were using complementary and alternative sleep aids for insomnia. Lunar Sleep was a top choice. Use Promo Code: Sleep2014 and only pay $1.95 S&H.

Get Lunar Sleep for $1.95

More Senior Health Articles

Palliative Care Raises Quality of Life, But Doesn't Extend It

Palliative Care Raises Quality of Life, But Doesn't Extend It0

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Palliative care can ease the burden that a serious illness places on both a patient and loved ones, but there's no evidence that it can extend the life of a sick person, a review of the available evidence has ...

1 in 4 Seniors Doesn't Discuss End-of-Life Care

1 in 4 Seniors Doesn't Discuss End-of-Life Care0

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-quarter of American seniors have never discussed end-of-life care, a new study finds. "Despite decades of work to improve advance care planning, over a quarter of older adults have still ...

Clots May Be the Cause of Fainting in Some Elderly

Clots May Be the Cause of Fainting in Some Elderly0

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When elderly adults suffer a fainting spell, a blood clot in the lungs may be the culprit more often than doctors have realized, a new study suggests. Italian researchers found that among 560 ...

Better Way to Treat Seniors' Ankle Fractures?

Better Way to Treat Seniors' Ankle Fractures?0

TUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new type of plaster cast might help older adults avoid surgery for unstable ankle fractures, researchers say. "Older adults -- those over 60 -- are suffering an increasing number of ankle fractures ...

Seniors With Hip Fractures Fare Better in Large Teaching Hospitals: Study

Seniors With Hip Fractures Fare Better in Large Teaching Hospitals: Study0

MONDAY, Oct. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors with hip fractures may be more likely to die if they're treated in smaller community hospitals than in large teaching hospitals, a new Canadian study suggests. About 10 percent of hip fracture ...

View More Senior Health Articles

0 Comments

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Our Mailing List

Subscribe to our mailing list to get the latest health news as it breaks!

Your information will not be shared with anyone!