Daily Health Headlines

Play to Win When It Comes to Kids and Sports Pain

👤by HealthDay 0 comments 🕔Monday, September 12th, 2016

SATURDAY, Sept. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Pain can be a problem for young athletes, so it's important for parents to know how to deal with it, a pain specialist says.

"Now that kids are back in school and fall sports are well underway, there are many things parents can do to help their children avoid getting hurt while still enjoying sports," said Dr. Anita Gupta. She is a member of the American Society of Anesthesiologists' Committee on Pain Medicine.

"And, if they do get injured, it's also important to address the pain effectively," Gupta said in a society news release.

If a child complains of pain after sports, don't ignore it. If the problem seems minor -- such as a sore muscle -- try ice and rest for a day or two.

If the pain doesn't get better or is more serious, see a doctor who specializes in pain medicine, Gupta recommended.

If possible, avoid the use of powerful prescription opioid painkillers, she said. It's best to start with so-called RICE therapy (Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), she added.

The most effective way to treat pain is by combining various treatments, according to Gupta.

The combination therapy can include: physical therapy to increase range of motion and strengthen muscles; compression braces to support the injured joint and reduce swelling; interventional procedures such as nerve blocks; medications such as anti-inflammatories to reduce swelling; and alternative therapies such as biofeedback, massage and acupuncture.

Gupta also said try to avoid injuries in the first place. It's important that your child has the right equipment, she said. Children should also be taught the proper techniques in each sport, and they should stretch to warm up their muscles, she added.

-- Robert Preidt

Article Credits / Source

HealthDay

HealthDay provides up to the minute breaking health news. Click here to view this full article from HealthDay.

SOURCE: American Society of Anesthesiologists, news release, Sept. 6, 2016

View More Articles From HealthDay 🌎View Article Website

Sponsored Product

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

People who have trouble sleeping typically have low levels of melatonin, so melatonin supplements seem like a logical fix for insomnia. There is a high demand for sleep aids, especially in the U.S. The National Health Interview Survey done in 2002, and again in 2007, found 1.6 million US adults were using complementary and alternative sleep aids for insomnia. Lunar Sleep was a top choice. Use Promo Code: Sleep2014 and only pay $1.95 S&H.

Get Lunar Sleep for $1.95

More Pediatrics / Healthy Kids Articles

Survival Tips for Holiday Road Trips

Survival Tips for Holiday Road Trips0

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- If you're among the millions of Americans planning to hit the highway over the Thanksgiving holiday, it's important to anticipate bumps in the road, according to a group dedicated to public education and ...

'Enthusiastic' Dads May Mean Less Troubled Kids: Study

'Enthusiastic' Dads May Mean Less Troubled Kids: Study0

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- While quality time spent with kids is always important, new research suggests it's a man's attitude that's key to raising happy children. The British study found that the babies of confident, ...

Keep Kids in Mind When Politics Intrude at Thanksgiving

Keep Kids in Mind When Politics Intrude at Thanksgiving0

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- This Thanksgiving, especially, political differences could spark dinner-table debates that quickly escalate. Two psychiatrists warn that these heated exchanges can harm kids who may overhear ...

Health Tip: Keep Kids Safe During the Holidays

Health Tip: Keep Kids Safe During the Holidays0

(HealthDay News) -- A host of new hazards for young children creep up during the holidays. Here are suggestions for parents and caregivers to help keep kids safe, courtesy of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Supervise ...

TV Snack Ads Make Preschoolers Snack More: Study

TV Snack Ads Make Preschoolers Snack More: Study0

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Preschoolers who watched "Sesame Street" interrupted by TV ads for a salty snack food ended up eating more of that food soon after, a new study found. The finding suggests that "young children remain ...

View More Pediatrics / Healthy Kids Articles

0 Comments

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Our Mailing List

Subscribe to our mailing list to get the latest health news as it breaks!

Your information will not be shared with anyone!