Daily Health Headlines

Detecting Hearing Loss in Children

👤by MedicineNet.com 0 comments 🕔Friday, February 14th, 2014

Medical Editor:

James K. Bredenkamp, MD, FACS

James K. Bredenkamp, MD, FACS

Dr. Bredenkamp recieved his medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine. He then went on to serve a six year residency at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine in the department of Surgery.

Medical Editor:

William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Determining hearing loss in children facts Children can be tested for hearing loss at any age. There are several risk factors associated with hearing loss, including ear infections, prematurity, diseases, and syndromes. Early identification of hearing loss will permit effective intervention, allowing for speech, language and cognitive development that are on target with a child's peers. The ABR and the OAE evaluations are effective tests for infants and children who cannot cooperate for a traditional hearing evaluation. Visual reinforcement audiometry and play audiometry are two behavioral methods used for testing cooperative children, which can obtain results similar to an adult evaluation. A test of the middle-ear system should be included in a diagnostic hearing evaluation for all children. When a hearing loss is detected, the child should be referred to an otolaryngologist or ENT to identify the cause of the loss. Further recommendations can be made by the ENT. Myth

Accurate hearing testing cannot be done until a child reaches the age of 5 or 6.

Fact

Current technology now permits the accurate assessments of hearing in children starting within a few hours of birth. In fact, all states have mandates that testing of hearing be done in the newborn prior to discharge from the hospital.

Why test a child's hearing?

A child with undetected hearing loss may not be able to develop normal speech and language or acquire the cognitive abilities (knowing, thinking, and judging) needed for learning. Children whose hearing loss is not identified until, for example, 2 or 3 years of age may suffer from permanent impairment of speech, language, and learning.

The early identification of hearing loss permits the initiation of treatment and rehabilitation of the hearing-impaired child at a very young age. The child can then learn more normal speech skills when hearing loss is identified early and intervention begins.

Hearing loss can range from a mild impairment to profound loss. Many people think that hearing is only graded as normal or deaf. They may also think that the child is hearing normally if he or she is responding to sounds and voices. However, there are many subtle gradations between normal hearing and deafness and a child's hearing loss may not be apparent.

For example, it is common for a child with moderate hearing loss to develop speech and language and yet miss over half of what is being said. A child in this situation will have a distinct disadvantage in development and learning and will often reach a point where advancement stops unless the hearing loss is detected and treatment begins.

The stress on a child with hearing loss (and their family) can be enormous because the child does not understand why it is constant struggle to learn seemingly simple material (and the family is baffled as to why their bright child is not doing well).

The degree of hearing loss often determines the impact it will have on the child throughout life. However, with early identification and treatment, the impact can be lessened.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/14/2014

Detecting Hearing Loss in Children Index Find a Local Doctor

Patient Comments Viewers share their comments

Hearing Loss in Children - Diagnosis Question: How did you first notice your child may have hearing problems?

Hearing Loss in Children - Diagnosis Question: How did you first notice your child may have hearing problems?

Hearing Loss - Treatment Question: Please explain how doctors treated your child's hearing loss.

Author:

Jillyen E. Kibby, MA, CCC-A

Jillyen E. Kibby, MA, CCC-A

Ms. Kibby received her master's degree in Audiology with honors from California State University, Long Beach, and is currently pursuing her doctorate at the University of Florida. She completed her clinical fellowship and spent seven years at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston, where she trained for her pediatric specialty.

Author:

David Perlstein, MD, MBA, FAAP

David Perlstein, MD, MBA, FAAP

Dr. Perlstein received his Medical Degree from the University of Cincinnati and then completed his internship and residency in pediatrics at The New York Hospital, Cornell medical Center in New York City. After serving an additional year as Chief Pediatric Resident, he worked as a private practitioner and then was appointed Director of Ambulatory Pediatrics at St. Barnabas Hospital in the Bronx.

Article Credits / Source

MedicineNet.com

MedicineNet.com provides up to the minute breaking health news. Click here to view this full article from MedicineNet.com.

View More Articles From MedicineNet.com 🌎View Article Website

Sponsored Product

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

People who have trouble sleeping typically have low levels of melatonin, so melatonin supplements seem like a logical fix for insomnia. There is a high demand for sleep aids, especially in the U.S. The National Health Interview Survey done in 2002, and again in 2007, found 1.6 million US adults were using complementary and alternative sleep aids for insomnia. Lunar Sleep was a top choice. Use Promo Code: Sleep2014 and only pay $1.95 S&H.

Get Lunar Sleep for $1.95

More Pediatrics / Healthy Kids Articles

Survival Tips for Holiday Road Trips

Survival Tips for Holiday Road Trips0

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- If you're among the millions of Americans planning to hit the highway over the Thanksgiving holiday, it's important to anticipate bumps in the road, according to a group dedicated to public education and ...

'Enthusiastic' Dads May Mean Less Troubled Kids: Study

'Enthusiastic' Dads May Mean Less Troubled Kids: Study0

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- While quality time spent with kids is always important, new research suggests it's a man's attitude that's key to raising happy children. The British study found that the babies of confident, ...

Keep Kids in Mind When Politics Intrude at Thanksgiving

Keep Kids in Mind When Politics Intrude at Thanksgiving0

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- This Thanksgiving, especially, political differences could spark dinner-table debates that quickly escalate. Two psychiatrists warn that these heated exchanges can harm kids who may overhear ...

Health Tip: Keep Kids Safe During the Holidays

Health Tip: Keep Kids Safe During the Holidays0

(HealthDay News) -- A host of new hazards for young children creep up during the holidays. Here are suggestions for parents and caregivers to help keep kids safe, courtesy of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Supervise ...

TV Snack Ads Make Preschoolers Snack More: Study

TV Snack Ads Make Preschoolers Snack More: Study0

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Preschoolers who watched "Sesame Street" interrupted by TV ads for a salty snack food ended up eating more of that food soon after, a new study found. The finding suggests that "young children remain ...

View More Pediatrics / Healthy Kids Articles

0 Comments

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Our Mailing List

Subscribe to our mailing list to get the latest health news as it breaks!

Your information will not be shared with anyone!