Daily Health Headlines

Dental Crowns

👤by MedicineNet.com 0 comments 🕔Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

The anatomy of a tooth can be divided into two basic parts -- the root and the crown. In a person with healthy gums and bone, the root of the tooth is covered by the gums and bone. The part of the tooth that is visible in the mouth, above the gum line on lower teeth and below the gum line on upper teeth, is called the clinical crown. A cemented restoration that partially or completely covers the outside of the clinical crown is referred to as a dental crown or cap.

Other relevant terms

Crown preparation: This is the design of the tooth after it has been shaved down to allow room for a crown. The preparation design depends on the material that the crown will be made from, previous fillings, fractures, and root canal therapy performed on the tooth while trying to maintain enough tooth structure for the crown to adhere onto.

Margin: This is the edge of the crown that meets the prepared surface of the tooth. This needs to be smooth with no gaps or ledges.

Cusps: These are the raised or pointy parts of a crown that are the primary tools for tearing and chewing food. When a cusp has been damaged from a cavity or fracture, the tooth needs a crown to prevent further damage.

Partial crown/onlay: This is a crown that only covers some of the cusps of the tooth, but not all of them. This restoration is chosen as a conservative measure to preserve as much tooth structure as possible. When conditions allow, this is the preferred type of crown restoration.

Dental veneer: Porcelain veneers are partial crowns that cover only the front and biting edge of teeth. These all-ceramic restorations are usually placed on front teeth to change the color or shape of teeth or add symmetry and balance to a smile. Since they are sometimes placed on crooked teeth, treatment with veneers has sometimes been referred to as "instant orthodontics."

Temporary/provisional: This is a temporary crown that is placed on the tooth while waiting for the final crown to be made by the dental lab. Temporary crowns shouldn't be left on a tooth for very long because they are made of weak materials and cemented with weak cement that doesn't seal the tooth for very long. Occasionally, a temporary crown will purposely be left on for a prolonged period of time by the dentist to make sure it becomes free of pain or other symptoms.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 7/2/2014

Dental Crowns Index Find a Local Doctor

Patient Comments Viewers share their comments

Dental Crowns - Pain Question: Did you experience pain after getting a dental crown?

Dental Crowns - Cost Question: How much did your dental crown cost? Did your insurance cover it?

Dental Crowns - During Pregnancy Question: Did you need a dental crown while you were pregnant?

Dental Crowns - Material Question: What material is your dental crown made from?

Medical Author:

Steven B. Horne, DDS

Steven B. Horne, DDS

Dr. Steve Horne began his career at Brigham Young University obtaining his BA in English. He earned his Doctorate of Dental Surgery in 2007 from the University of Southern California where his pursuit for academic excellence landed him on the Dean's List. He was recognized for his superior clinical skills and invited to help teach other dental students in courses on restorative dentistry, prosthodontics, and tooth anatomy. During dental school, he provided dental care for underserved populations of Los Angeles and Orange County, Mexico, and Costa Rica with AYUDA. Following dental school, Dr. Horne entered active duty with the U.S. Army and practiced dentistry at Fort Knox, Kentucky, for four years. During this time, he was deployed to Baghdad, Iraq, and received multiple Army Achievement Medals, the Army Commendation Medal, and served as Company Commander. Dr. Horne currently practices full time at Torrey Pines Dental Arts in La Jolla, California, as a general dentist. Dr. Horne is a member of the American Dental Association, the California Dental Association, and the Academy of General Dentistry. Dr. Horne is married to his wife, Christy, and they have a chocolate Labrador named Roscoe.

Medical Editor:

William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Article Credits / Source

MedicineNet.com

MedicineNet.com provides up to the minute breaking health news. Click here to view this full article from MedicineNet.com.

View More Articles From MedicineNet.com 🌎View Article Website

Sponsored Product

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

People who have trouble sleeping typically have low levels of melatonin, so melatonin supplements seem like a logical fix for insomnia. There is a high demand for sleep aids, especially in the U.S. The National Health Interview Survey done in 2002, and again in 2007, found 1.6 million US adults were using complementary and alternative sleep aids for insomnia. Lunar Sleep was a top choice. Use Promo Code: Sleep2014 and only pay $1.95 S&H.

Get Lunar Sleep for $1.95

More Oral Health Articles

Health Tip: Make Brushing Teeth Fun

Health Tip: Make Brushing Teeth Fun0

(HealthDay News) -- Tooth brushing doesn't have to be a boring chore. Turn it into fun time that kids enjoy. The American Dental Association suggests: Skip the timer and turn on your child's favorite two-minute song. Or read a silly story ...

E-Cigarettes Not Good to Gums, Study Finds

E-Cigarettes Not Good to Gums, Study Finds0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic cigarettes could be as harmful to gums and teeth as regular cigarettes are, a new study suggests. In laboratory experiments, researchers at the University of Rochester in New York exposed ...

Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS)

Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS)0

The uncomfortable feeling of dryness of the mouth can be annoying. It can also lead to dental problems and infections of the mouth. Many products are now available over-the-counter as well as by prescription for the relief of chronic mouth dryness and ...

Cavities Between Teeth

Cavities Between Teeth0

Cavities in between teeth are commonly referred to as interproximal cavities or decay by your general dentist. Cavities form when there is breakdown of the outer, calcified enamel of the tooth by bacteria commonly found in the human mouth. The ...

Health Tip: Avoid Damaging Teeth

Health Tip: Avoid Damaging Teeth0

(HealthDay News) -- Brushing and flossing are frequently touted as ways to keep your teeth healthy, but there also are habits that you should avoid to keep your pearly whites in tip-top shape. The American Dental Association ...

View More Oral Health Articles

0 Comments

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Our Mailing List

Subscribe to our mailing list to get the latest health news as it breaks!

Your information will not be shared with anyone!