Daily Health Headlines

Zika Not Changing Most Americans' Florida Travel Plans: Poll

👤by HealthDay 0 comments 🕔Monday, August 15th, 2016

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Concerns around the mosquito-borne Zika virus aren't dampening many Americans' plans to visit Florida, a new survey shows.

Earlier this month, the first cases of locally acquired Zika infection were confirmed in the Miami-area Wynwood neighborhood. The virus can cause a transitory illness but is most dangerous to pregnant women, since maternal infection can trigger a serious birth defect called microcephaly. Babies with microcephaly are born with too-small heads and underdeveloped brains.

The new survey was conducted three days after the first 15 non-travel-related cases of Zika were reported in the Miami area. That has now increased to 25 cases, according to Florida health officials.

In their poll, researchers at the University of Florida questioned 828 people nationwide. All had already planned to visit the state within the next six months.

Most of the would-be visitors to Florida seem undeterred by the Zika news. More than 70 percent of those surveyed said they were concerned about the virus, but less than 10 percent of those with concerns changed their travel plans, according to researchers at the university's Tourism Crisis Management Initiative (TCMI).

Of the 10 percent of respondents who said they were changing their travel plans, 60 percent said they would postpone their visit to Florida, while 25 percent said they would travel somewhere else.

Among those who changed their plans, about 15 percent consulted with a health care provider before making that decision, the researchers noted.

The survey also found that 45 percent of respondents had "medium to high" levels of knowledge about Zika, and 82 percent knew about protective measures such as use of insect repellents, staying indoors with air conditioning, and having screened windows and doors.

There are steps that Florida officials can take to encourage visitors and keep them safe, stressed study lead author Ignatius Cahyanto in a University of Florida news release.

"Making insect repellent available for guests in public areas of hotels and other public accommodations, as well as directing them to information such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] website, would help to build protective behaviors," said Cahyanto, an affiliate TCMI researcher from Black Hills State University in Spearfish, S.D.

-- Robert Preidt

Article Credits / Source

HealthDay

HealthDay provides up to the minute breaking health news. Click here to view this full article from HealthDay.

SOURCE: University of Florida, news release, Aug. 11, 2016

View More Articles From HealthDay 🌎View Article Website

Sponsored Product

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

People who have trouble sleeping typically have low levels of melatonin, so melatonin supplements seem like a logical fix for insomnia. There is a high demand for sleep aids, especially in the U.S. The National Health Interview Survey done in 2002, and again in 2007, found 1.6 million US adults were using complementary and alternative sleep aids for insomnia. Lunar Sleep was a top choice. Use Promo Code: Sleep2014 and only pay $1.95 S&H.

Get Lunar Sleep for $1.95

More Infectious Disease Articles

FDA Scientists Develop Mouse Model for Zika Research

FDA Scientists Develop Mouse Model for Zika Research0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A mouse strain developed by U.S. government scientists could help speed up research into vaccines and treatments for the Zika virus, researchers report. Newborn mice of the new strain created by U.S. ...

'Superbug' Common Among N.C. Hog Workers, Study Says

'Superbug' Common Among N.C. Hog Workers, Study Says0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some workers at hog production facilities in the United States have skin infections from drug-resistant "superbugs," researchers report. Hogs are given antibiotics to speed their growth. But, overuse of ...

Bagged Salads May Be Fertile Ground for Bacteria

Bagged Salads May Be Fertile Ground for Bacteria0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prepackaged salads may promote the growth of salmonella bacteria, researchers report. They found that even slight damage to leaves in salad bags released juices that encouraged the spread of ...

Zika No Longer 'Global Health Emergency,' WHO Says

Zika No Longer 'Global Health Emergency,' WHO Says0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Zika, the mosquito-borne virus that can cause severe birth defects in the infants of infected mothers, is no longer a "global health emergency," the United Nation's World Health Organization (WHO) declared ...

U.S. Hospitals Halve Catheter Infection Rates: Review

U.S. Hospitals Halve Catheter Infection Rates: Review0

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. hospitals have cut in half the number of potentially deadly bloodstream infections linked to so-called central-line catheters since 2008. But, too many critically ill patients are still exposed to ...

View More Infectious Disease Articles

0 Comments

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Our Mailing List

Subscribe to our mailing list to get the latest health news as it breaks!

Your information will not be shared with anyone!