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Vaccination Schedule for Adults and Adolescents

👤by MedicineNet.com 0 comments 🕔Wednesday, September 14th, 2016

What are vaccine-preventable diseases?

Vaccine-preventable diseases are those diseases for which there is a shot that helps the immune system prepare for an infection. A person develops immunity after he or she has received a vaccine and responded to it. When a vaccinated person is exposed to a virus (for example, hepatitis B) or bacteria (for example, diphtheria), his or her body is able to destroy the virus or bacteria and prevent the disease. No vaccine is perfect, and some people who receive a vaccine can still get the disease. This is why it is important for everyone to get the vaccine. This gives the community what experts call "herd" immunity and means that, basically, there are very few people who could serve as a reservoir for the disease. Herd immunity prevents severe outbreaks of diseases.

The following table lists vaccine-preventable diseases:

Disease Vaccine Diphtheria Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) Hepatitis A Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis B Human papillomavirus Human papillomavirus (HPV) (multiple vaccines) Influenza Annual influenza vaccine Measles Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) Meningococcal disease Meningococcal (two vaccines covering separate serogroups) Mumps Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) Pertussis Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) Pneumococcal disease Pneumococcal (multiple vaccines covering different serogroups) Polio Inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) Rubella Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) Tetanus Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) Varicella Varicella

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/14/2016

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