Daily Health Headlines

Is Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Contagious?

👤by MedicineNet.com 0 comments 🕔Tuesday, August 16th, 2016

Several broad categories of patients are most vulnerable to RSV infection. These include:

premature infants and all infants less than 1 year of age, children 2 years old with cardiac disease or chronic lung disease (for example, asthma, cystic fibrosis, etc.), those of any age with a compromised immune system, and those 65 years of age or older.

Is respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) contagious?

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is contagious. In the United States, it's the most common cause of inflammation of the small airways in the lungs (bronchiolitis) and of pneumonia in children under 1 year of age. It also is significant cause of respiratory illnesses in older adults. Nearly all children in the U.S. will have been infected by RSV by 2 years of age. RSV usually causes a mild respiratory infection, but it can occasionally cause more serious infections that require hospitalization from breathing compromise with bronchiolitis or pneumonia. RSV was discovered in 1956 (isolated from a chimpanzee but later found to be from human origins) and was designated chimpanzee coryza agent by J. Morris and associates. Years later, the viruses were renamed respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). In virology terminology, RSV is an enveloped RNA virus and is a member of the family Paramyxoviridae that infects lung tissue.

What is the incubation period for a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection?

Most infants and children and older adults usually develop symptoms about four to six days after their first exposure to RSV. This is referred to as the incubation period. Symptoms of RSV include a runny nose and decreased appetite followed by coughing, sneezing, no fever or a mild fever at one to three days. Most individuals with RSV who are otherwise healthy do not require hospitalization. However, some very young infants and others may develop more serious symptoms of wheezing, irritability, decreased activity, cyanosis (blue-gray color to skin) and breathing difficulties. Some of these individuals may require short (three to five days) hospital stays. Even more severe infections can require supported breathing. Definitive diagnosis can be done by viral cultures, detecting RSV antigens, PCR assays, and molecular probes (molecules used to detect other molecules or structures).

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 8/16/2016

Article Credits / Source

MedicineNet.com

MedicineNet.com provides up to the minute breaking health news. Click here to view this full article from MedicineNet.com.

View More Articles From MedicineNet.com 🌎View Article Website

Sponsored Product

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

People who have trouble sleeping typically have low levels of melatonin, so melatonin supplements seem like a logical fix for insomnia. There is a high demand for sleep aids, especially in the U.S. The National Health Interview Survey done in 2002, and again in 2007, found 1.6 million US adults were using complementary and alternative sleep aids for insomnia. Lunar Sleep was a top choice. Use Promo Code: Sleep2014 and only pay $1.95 S&H.

Get Lunar Sleep for $1.95

More Infectious Disease Articles

FDA Scientists Develop Mouse Model for Zika Research

FDA Scientists Develop Mouse Model for Zika Research0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A mouse strain developed by U.S. government scientists could help speed up research into vaccines and treatments for the Zika virus, researchers report. Newborn mice of the new strain created by U.S. ...

'Superbug' Common Among N.C. Hog Workers, Study Says

'Superbug' Common Among N.C. Hog Workers, Study Says0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some workers at hog production facilities in the United States have skin infections from drug-resistant "superbugs," researchers report. Hogs are given antibiotics to speed their growth. But, overuse of ...

Bagged Salads May Be Fertile Ground for Bacteria

Bagged Salads May Be Fertile Ground for Bacteria0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Prepackaged salads may promote the growth of salmonella bacteria, researchers report. They found that even slight damage to leaves in salad bags released juices that encouraged the spread of ...

Zika No Longer 'Global Health Emergency,' WHO Says

Zika No Longer 'Global Health Emergency,' WHO Says0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Zika, the mosquito-borne virus that can cause severe birth defects in the infants of infected mothers, is no longer a "global health emergency," the United Nation's World Health Organization (WHO) declared ...

U.S. Hospitals Halve Catheter Infection Rates: Review

U.S. Hospitals Halve Catheter Infection Rates: Review0

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. hospitals have cut in half the number of potentially deadly bloodstream infections linked to so-called central-line catheters since 2008. But, too many critically ill patients are still exposed to ...

View More Infectious Disease Articles

0 Comments

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Our Mailing List

Subscribe to our mailing list to get the latest health news as it breaks!

Your information will not be shared with anyone!