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Selfie deaths are slowly rising around the world

👤by FoxNews.com 0 comments 🕔Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

More people are dying for the perfect selfie.

A new study titled, "Me, Myself and My Killfie: Characterizing and Preventing Selfie Deaths" found that 127 people have died in a 29-month span through last September while trying to get photos of themselves at dangerous or exotic locations. The overwhelming majority of the deaths compiled by researchers occurred in India, where 76 people died. In the United States, there were eight selfie-related deaths.

The most common factor behind the so-called "selfie deaths"- defined as a death of an individual or group that could have been avoided had the individual(s) not been taking a selfie- was a fall from an elevated location like buildings or mountains. Deaths involving both elevation and water were next, followed by fatalities involving trains, according to researchers from Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania and two colleges in India.

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"We found that taking selfies on train tracks is a trend," the study reads. "This trend caters to the belief that posting on or next to train tracks with their best friend is regarded as romantic and a sign of never-ending friendship."

Researchers found a total of eight factors behind the deaths, including weapons, vehicles, electricity and animals. The earliest reference to a selfie-involved death was published in March 2014, they found. Since then, a total of 15 deaths were tallied in 2014, followed by 39 last year and 73 deaths through September in 2016, according to the study.

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