Daily Health Headlines

Pinworm Test

👤by MedicineNet.com 0 comments 🕔Monday, February 3rd, 2014

Medical Editor:

Jay W. Marks, MD

Jay W. Marks, MD

Jay W. Marks, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist. He graduated from Yale University School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and gastroenterology at UCLA/Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

What is pinworm infection?

Pinworm infection is caused by the helminth (Enterobius vermicularis), a small, white parasitic worm. The pinworm is about the length of a staple (ranges from 2 to 13 mm [0.08 to 1/2 an inch]) and lives for the most part in the rectum of humans. While an infected person is asleep, female pinworms exit the intestines through the anus and deposit eggs on the skin around the anus. Within a few hours of being deposited on the skin around the anus, pinworm eggs become infectious (capable of infecting another person). Pinworm eggs can survive up to three weeks on clothing, bedding, or other objects if the environment is moist.

What is the pinworm test?

If pinworms are suspected, transparent adhesive tape or a pinworm paddle (supplied by your healthcare provider) is applied to the anal region. The tape can pick up both eggs and occasionally the adult worms. Most clinicians suggest the test be done as soon as the person awakens and before any bowel movement or cleansing (bath, shower) as these actions tend to remove the eggs and parasites from the anal/rectal area.

The pinworm eggs or a few adult worms adhere to the sticky tape or paddle and are identified by examination under an ordinary microscope by a qualified laboratory technician.

In some individuals, it is possible to see the adult worms without a microscope, but the transparent eggs are small and can only bee seen with a microscope.

When should the pinworm test be done?

The test should be done as soon as you wake up in the morning (because bathing or having a bowel movement may remove eggs). The exam may require several samples for a positive diagnosis. Researchers suggest that repeating the test at about three different intervals yields about a 90% detection rate.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/3/2014

Medical Author:

Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

Medical Editor:

Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Article Credits / Source

MedicineNet.com

MedicineNet.com provides up to the minute breaking health news. Click here to view this full article from MedicineNet.com.

View More Articles From MedicineNet.com 🌎View Article Website

Sponsored Product

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

People who have trouble sleeping typically have low levels of melatonin, so melatonin supplements seem like a logical fix for insomnia. There is a high demand for sleep aids, especially in the U.S. The National Health Interview Survey done in 2002, and again in 2007, found 1.6 million US adults were using complementary and alternative sleep aids for insomnia. Lunar Sleep was a top choice. Use Promo Code: Sleep2014 and only pay $1.95 S&H.

Get Lunar Sleep for $1.95

More Digestion Articles

Colitis (Types)

Colitis (Types)0

What are the symptoms of colitis? Colitis can be caused by infections, loss of blood supply, or chronic diseases. Despite the cause, people suffering from colitis may have typical symptoms that include abdominal pain, cramping, bloating, ...

Poor Sleep Linked to Worsening Kidney Disease

Poor Sleep Linked to Worsening Kidney Disease0

SATURDAY, Nov. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For people with chronic kidney disease, poor sleep may boost the chances that their illness will worsen, new research suggests. "Short sleep and fragmented sleep are significant yet unappreciated risk ...

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis0

Pancreatitis Symptoms Changes in Stool Color Certain persistent changes in stool color are characteristic for specific conditions such as: Pale yellow, greasy, foul-smelling stool: malabsorption of fat due to pancreatic ...

Stomach Flu (Gastroenteritis )

Stomach Flu (Gastroenteritis )0

Stomach flu (gastroenteritis) definition and facts Readers Comments 9 Share Your Story The stomach flu (gastroenteritis) is a nonspecific term for various inflammatory problems in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Gastroenteritis may be of ...

Poor Sleep Linked to Worsening Kidney Disease

Poor Sleep Linked to Worsening Kidney Disease0

SATURDAY, Nov. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For people with chronic kidney disease, poor sleep may boost the chances that their illness will worsen, new research suggests. "Short sleep and fragmented sleep are significant yet unappreciated risk ...

View More Digestion Articles

0 Comments

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Our Mailing List

Subscribe to our mailing list to get the latest health news as it breaks!

Your information will not be shared with anyone!