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Multiple Myeloma

👤by MedicineNet.com 0 comments 🕔Tuesday, September 17th, 2013

What is multiple myeloma?

Multiple myeloma is a type of cancer that is caused by malignant plasma cells that proliferate in the bone marrow and produce abnormally high amounts of a special protein. The special proteins are typically monoclonal paraprotein (M protein) and other compounds such as immunoglobulins. Plasma cells are white blood cells that make antibodies and are part of the body's immune system. Multiple myeloma plasma cell proliferation can result in etched away bone (lytic bone lesions), soft tissue masses, impaired immune system, and pain from collapsing bone and other systemic problems listed below.

What causes multiple myeloma?

What triggers plasma cells to become malignant in multiple myeloma is not known. The cancerous myeloma plasma cells proliferate and crowd out normal plasma cells and can etch away areas of bones. The proteins produced in large amounts can cause many of the symptoms of the disease by making the blood more thickened (viscous) and depositing the proteins in organs that can interfere with the functions of the kidneys, nerves, and immune system.

What are risk factors for multiple myeloma?

The definitive cause of multiple myeloma has not been established but research has suggested several factors may be risk factors or contribute to multiple myeloma development in an individual. A genetic abnormality such as c-Myc oncogenes and others have been associated with multiple myeloma development. Currently, there is no evidence that heredity plays a role in multiple myeloma development. Environmental exposures to herbicides, insecticides, benzene, hair dyes, and radiation have been suggested as causes but definitive data is lacking. Inflammation and infection have been suggested but again not proven to cause multiple myeloma. However, a "benign" proliferation of a plasma cell can result in a situation where a monoclonal antibody is produced in high amounts (but not as high as seen with multiple myeloma). This result is termed monoclonal gammopathy of unknown or undetermined significance (abbreviated as MGUS). About 19% of MGUS patients develop multiple myeloma in about 2 to 19 years after MGUS diagnosis. In addition, about 7% of multiple myeloma patients develop MGUS within a year of developing multiple myeloma (this particular form of MGUS is termed secondary MGUS). Some researchers think MGUS antibody may result from as yet undetermined sources of inflammation or infection.

Reviewed by William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR on 9/17/2013

Multiple Myeloma Index Find a Local Doctor

Medical Author:

Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

Dr. Charles "Pat" Davis, MD, PhD, is a board certified Emergency Medicine doctor who currently practices as a consultant and staff member for hospitals. He has a PhD in Microbiology (UT at Austin), and the MD (Univ. Texas Medical Branch, Galveston). He is a Clinical Professor (retired) in the Division of Emergency Medicine, UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, and has been the Chief of Emergency Medicine at UT Medical Branch and at UTHSCSA with over 250 publications.

Medical Editor:

William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.

Patient Comments Viewers share their comments

Multiple Myeloma - Symptoms Question: What were the symptoms of your multiple myeloma?

Multiple Myeloma - Prognosis Question: What is the prognosis for your multiple myeloma?

Multiple Myeloma - Diagnosis Question: Describe the tests and exams that led to a diagnosis of multiple myeloma.

Multiple Myeloma - Treatment Question: What kinds of treatment have you, a friend, or loved one received for multiple myeloma?

Multiple Myeloma - Follow-up care Question: What type of follow-up care do you or a relative receive for multiple myeloma?

Weight Gain & Cancer Risk

Medical Author: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MDMedical Editor: William C. Shiel Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

Excess weight is a known risk factor for many chronic diseases, such as diabetesand heart disease. Obesityhas also been linked an increased risk for developing some cancers. To clarify the effects of weight gain on cancer risk, researchers in 2007 conducted an analysis of many studies reported in medical journals that describe 282,137 cases of cancer. The researchers wanted to see if weight gain had an effect on the risk for certain cancer types.

In particular, the researchers looked at the risk of cancer associated with a weight gain corresponding to an increase of 5 kg/m2 in body mass index(BMI). In terms of actual pounds gained, a man with a normal-range BMI of 23 would need to gain 15 kg (33 lbs.) of weight, while a woman with a BMI of 23 would need to gain 13 kg (28.6 lbs.) to correspond to an increase of 5 in the BMI.

The results, published in the Lancet in February 2008, revealed that weight gain is positively associated with the risk of developing a variety of types of cancer as described below.

For women, a weight gain corresponding to an increase of 5 in the BMI resulted in a significant increase in risk for developing four cancer types:

esophageal adenocarcinoma(double the risk), endometrial cancer (slightly more than double the risk), gallbladder cancer (slightly more than double the risk), and kidney (renal) cancer.

In women, a weaker but still positive increase in cancer risk with weight gain was demonstrated for the following cancer types:

postmenopausal breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, thyroid cancer, colon cancer, leukemia, multiple myeloma, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

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