Daily Health Headlines

Earnings Fall After a Child's Cancer Diagnosis

👤by HealthDay 0 comments 🕔Monday, November 21st, 2016

MONDAY, Nov. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- After a child's cancer diagnosis, parents' income often drops and mothers frequently stop working, a new study finds.

Moreover, the financial effects of a cancer diagnosis can last years, with mothers' earnings dipping significantly more than fathers' pay, the study suggests.

Mothers' incomes fell 21 percent in the first year after a child developed cancer versus 10 percent for fathers, according to the study.

"In addition to differences between mothers and fathers, we found that a younger age of parents [and] lower level of education ... were associated with more adverse effects on income," said study author Emma Hoven, of the Karolinska Institute in Sweden.

Researchers tracked more than 3,600 parents in Sweden whose 1,900 children were diagnosed with cancer between 2004 and 2009. The parents were compared to a group of about 35,000 parents whose children did not have cancer.

The results were published Nov. 21 in the journal Cancer.

The researchers saw signs of the income decline among mothers up to six years later, but only up to two years later for fathers.

Mothers of a child with cancer were also less likely to continue working compared to mothers of healthy children, and the researchers found signs of this discrepancy for up to five years.

But fathers' employment wasn't affected.

"Also, mothers with a higher income before the child's cancer were found to have an equivalent income level to control mothers at four years after diagnosis, whereas more adverse effects were found for mothers with a lower baseline income," Hoven said in a journal news release.

The study authors called for more assistance for parents of childhood cancer patients.

"This could include providing extended support from social work teams at the hospitals to help parents navigate the practical and emotional challenges following a child's cancer diagnosis," Hoven said.

"In particular, our findings show that more support and financial assistance should be advocated for young parents, mothers with a lower education, and mothers who were born in another country," she said.

-- Randy Dotinga

Article Credits / Source

HealthDay

HealthDay provides up to the minute breaking health news. Click here to view this full article from HealthDay.

SOURCE: Nov. 21, 2016, news release, Cancer

View More Articles From HealthDay 🌎View Article Website

Sponsored Product

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

People who have trouble sleeping typically have low levels of melatonin, so melatonin supplements seem like a logical fix for insomnia. There is a high demand for sleep aids, especially in the U.S. The National Health Interview Survey done in 2002, and again in 2007, found 1.6 million US adults were using complementary and alternative sleep aids for insomnia. Lunar Sleep was a top choice. Use Promo Code: Sleep2014 and only pay $1.95 S&H.

Get Lunar Sleep for $1.95

More Cancer Articles

No Benefit From Routine Thyroid Cancer Screening: Task Force

No Benefit From Routine Thyroid Cancer Screening: Task Force0

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors should not screen for thyroid cancer in patients who have no symptoms of the disease, according to a U.S. Preventive Services Task Force draft recommendation. It reaffirms a recommendation ...

Depressed Women Less Likely to Get Best Breast Cancer Care: Study

Depressed Women Less Likely to Get Best Breast Cancer Care: Study0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients with a history of depression are less likely to receive recommended care for their disease, a new study finds. The study included more than 45,000 Danish women diagnosed with ...

Monoclonal Antibodies

Monoclonal Antibodies0

home / cancer center / cancer a-z list / monoclonal antibodies index / monoclonal antibodies drug monograph Pharmacy Author: Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD Omudhome Ogbru, PharmDDr. Ogbru received his ...

New Drug May Brighten Outlook for Advanced Breast Cancer

New Drug May Brighten Outlook for Advanced Breast Cancer0

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A recently approved drug can help slow the progression of advanced breast cancer, a new clinical trial confirms. The drug, called palbociclib (Ibrance), was approved in the United States last year ...

Exercise Good for Cancer Patients During, After Treatment

Exercise Good for Cancer Patients During, After Treatment0

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Exercising during and after cancer treatment is safe and improves quality of life, fitness and physical functioning, new research indicates. Benefits occurred with all types of exercise, said study ...

View More Cancer Articles

0 Comments

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Our Mailing List

Subscribe to our mailing list to get the latest health news as it breaks!

Your information will not be shared with anyone!