Daily Health Headlines

Exercise Preventing Asthma?

👤by AP 0 comments 🕔Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

Medical Author: Alan Szeftel, MD, FCCPMedical Editor: William C. Shiel, Jr., MD, FACP, FACR

On many occasions, patients have asked me whether exercise will help prevent asthma. This issue is receiving more attention in light of the global increase in the prevalence and severity of asthma and the ongoing efforts to explain this phenomenon. Could a change in lifestyle somehow be responsible for this trend in asthma? Scientists who work in this area have pointed out several childhood developmental and lifestyle differences during the past 40 years.

Let us go back in our minds to the 1960s. It is late afternoon and school is out. Little Johnny and Jane come racing through the back door to find mom greeting them with a glass of milk and a sandwich or an apple. The kids eat their snack and are soon in the neighborhood yard with their friends, playing ball or climbing trees. Now, let us fast forward to the 21st century, where Jason and Jessica let themselves in the house because their parents are not home from work yet. They drop their backpacks on the floor, walk straight to the kitchen, and grab cookies or a bag of potato chips and a soda. They then collapse on the couch, switch on the TV, and vegetate. They may remain there until bedtime, fitting in homework during the commercials. If their favorite programs are not on, some kids settle in front of the computer, surfing the Internet, or playing video games.

There has obviously been a tremendous change in children's lifestyle, from being active and exercise-based to sedentary and technology-based. This lack of exercise, and the possible obesity associated with it, may in fact have played a role in the increasing burden of asthma.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/9/2014

Article Credits / Source

AP / MedicineNet.com

AP wrote this story for MedicineNet.com. MedicineNet.com provides up to the minute breaking health news. Click here to view this full article from MedicineNet.com.

View More Articles From AP 🌎View Article Website

Sponsored Product

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

Lunar Sleep for $1.95

People who have trouble sleeping typically have low levels of melatonin, so melatonin supplements seem like a logical fix for insomnia. There is a high demand for sleep aids, especially in the U.S. The National Health Interview Survey done in 2002, and again in 2007, found 1.6 million US adults were using complementary and alternative sleep aids for insomnia. Lunar Sleep was a top choice. Use Promo Code: Sleep2014 and only pay $1.95 S&H.

Get Lunar Sleep for $1.95

More Asthma Articles

ephedrine (oral)

ephedrine (oral)0

home / asthma center / asthma a-z list / ephedrine-oral index / ephedrine (oral) drug monograph Pharmacy Author: Omudhome Ogbru, PharmD Omudhome Ogbru, PharmDDr. Ogbru received his Doctorate in ...

Advair Diskus, Advair HFA (fluticasone and salmeterol oral inhaler)

Advair Diskus, Advair HFA (fluticasone and salmeterol oral inhaler)0

home / asthma center / asthma a-z list / fluticasone and salmeterol oral inhaler index / advair diskus, advair hfa (fluticasone and salmeterol oral inhaler) drug monograph Pharmacy Author: Omudhome ...

Occupational Asthma

Occupational Asthma0

Wheezing is a whistling sound that occurs during breathing, usually during expiration (breathing air out of the lungs) through narrowed airways. Inflammation of the airways, bronchospasm (tightening of the muscles around the bronchial tubes), and ...

Clean Home May Help Keep Kids' Asthma in Check

Clean Home May Help Keep Kids' Asthma in Check0

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing indoor allergens and pollutants can help control children's asthma, reducing their need for medication, according to a new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Many things in the ...

Asthma Medications

Asthma Medications0

Childhood Asthma Treatment There is often concern about potential long-term side effects for even inhaled corticosteroids. Numerous studies have repeatedly shown that even long-term use of inhaled corticosteroids has very few if any sustained ...

View More Asthma Articles

0 Comments

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Our Mailing List

Subscribe to our mailing list to get the latest health news as it breaks!

Your information will not be shared with anyone!