Daily Health Headlines

Robert Preidt / HealthDay

Robert Preidt wrote these articles for HealthDay. HealthDay provides up to the minute breaking health news.

Tobacco Flavors Draw in Young Folks

Tobacco Flavors Draw in Young Folks0

New Fetal Views in 3-D

New Fetal Views in 3-D0

Food Allergies Among Kids Vary by Race: Study

Food Allergies Among Kids Vary by Race: Study0

Your Recipe for a Healthy, Delicious Holiday Season

Your Recipe for a Healthy, Delicious Holiday Season0

Zika Babies May Look Normal at Birth, Display Brain Defects Later: CDC

Zika Babies May Look Normal at Birth, Display Brain Defects Later: CDC0

No Benefit From Routine Thyroid Cancer Screening: Task Force

No Benefit From Routine Thyroid Cancer Screening: Task Force0

Imaging Studies Shed Light on Zika's Effects

Imaging Studies Shed Light on Zika's Effects0

Drug Combo for Irregular Heartbeat Might Raise Bleeding Risk

Drug Combo for Irregular Heartbeat Might Raise Bleeding Risk0

Bonus From Your Blood Pressure Med: Fewer Fractures?

Bonus From Your Blood Pressure Med: Fewer Fractures?0

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A Benefit of Back Pain Surgery: Better Sex

A Benefit of Back Pain Surgery: Better Sex0

TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Surgery for back pain can often improve patients' sex lives, researchers report. "The impetus behind our study was to initiate the process of understanding how back surgery affects patients' lives," ...

Heart Attacks Up in New Orleans Post-Katrina

Heart Attacks Up in New Orleans Post-Katrina0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A major New Orleans hospital has seen a sharp spike in the rate of heart attacks in the 10 years since Hurricane Katrina devastated the city, a new study reports. Heart attack admissions to Tulane ...

FDA Scientists Develop Mouse Model for Zika Research

FDA Scientists Develop Mouse Model for Zika Research0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A mouse strain developed by U.S. government scientists could help speed up research into vaccines and treatments for the Zika virus, researchers report. Newborn mice of the new strain created by U.S. ...

Delays in Lupus Care Seen Among Minorities, Less Educated

Delays in Lupus Care Seen Among Minorities, Less Educated0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Delays in lupus treatment are more common among Americans who are black, Asian or are less educated, a new study finds. Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease in which inflammation affects the skin, ...

Depressed Women Less Likely to Get Best Breast Cancer Care: Study

Depressed Women Less Likely to Get Best Breast Cancer Care: Study0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients with a history of depression are less likely to receive recommended care for their disease, a new study finds. The study included more than 45,000 Danish women diagnosed with ...

Kids Can Beat 'Complex' Pneumonia Without IV Antibiotics: Study

Kids Can Beat 'Complex' Pneumonia Without IV Antibiotics: Study0

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotics taken orally are as effective -- and doubtless much more welcome -- than intravenous antibiotics for children recovering at home from complex pneumonia, a new study finds. Youngsters with ...

Is Your ATM Dispensing Bacteria?

Is Your ATM Dispensing Bacteria?0

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- You might want to wash your hands the next time you withdraw cash from an ATM machine, a new study suggests. ATM keypads in New York City were covered in bacteria, researchers reported, with most of ...

Low Blood Sugar Linked to Death Risk for Hospital Patients

Low Blood Sugar Linked to Death Risk for Hospital Patients0

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital patients with low blood sugar may be at increased risk for death, a new study from Israel suggests. The study included nearly 3,000 patients with low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Nearly 32 ...

FDA Explains Pros, Cons of Permanent Birth Control

FDA Explains Pros, Cons of Permanent Birth Control0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women need to carefully consider the benefits and risks of permanent birth control devices, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. The agency recently introduced labeling changes for one such ...

E-Cigarettes Not Good to Gums, Study Finds

E-Cigarettes Not Good to Gums, Study Finds0

FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic cigarettes could be as harmful to gums and teeth as regular cigarettes are, a new study suggests. In laboratory experiments, researchers at the University of Rochester in New York exposed ...

Safety Group Releases Annual Dangerous Toys List

Safety Group Releases Annual Dangerous Toys List0

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- With the holiday season approaching, the consumer watchdog group World Against Toys Causing Harm (WATCH) has released it annual list of the most dangerous toys. The organization urges parents to be ...

Many Atrial Fibrillation Patients Missing Out on Blood Thinners

Many Atrial Fibrillation Patients Missing Out on Blood Thinners0

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Half of patients hospitalized with the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation aren't given blood-thinning drugs that reduce the risk of clots and stroke, a new study finds. Atrial fibrillation, a ...

More U.S. Kids Getting Drug-Resistant Infections

More U.S. Kids Getting Drug-Resistant Infections0

THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotic-resistant infections are on the rise among American children, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed blood samples collected from kids aged 1 to 17 who received outpatient, inpatient, ...

High Blood Pressure Rates Have Doubled Worldwide Since 1975

High Blood Pressure Rates Have Doubled Worldwide Since 19750

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The number of people worldwide with high blood pressure has nearly doubled over the past 40 years, a new study reveals. At the same time, average blood pressure levels are at an all-time low in the ...

Poor Sense of Smell May Signal Alzheimer's Risk

Poor Sense of Smell May Signal Alzheimer's Risk0

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A person's sense of smell may help predict their risk for Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests. The researchers included 183 older people, and 10 had possible or probable Alzheimer's disease, ...

Having Rheumatoid Arthritis May Increase Heart Risk

Having Rheumatoid Arthritis May Increase Heart Risk0

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with rheumatoid arthritis may have an increased risk for a heart attack, stroke and other heart disease-related problems, a new study suggests. Researchers examined data from 353 rheumatoid ...

Alcohol May Fuel Prostate Cancer Risk

Alcohol May Fuel Prostate Cancer Risk0

TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Drinking may raise the risk of prostate cancer, and the more men drink the greater their risk, a new analysis of 27 studies suggests. Canadian and Australian scientists found a significant association ...

Tracking Blood Sugar in Pregnancy Might Lower Heart Defect Risk for Baby

Tracking Blood Sugar in Pregnancy Might Lower Heart Defect Risk for Baby0

MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Increases in a woman's blood sugar levels during early pregnancy may affect her baby's risk of congenital heart defects, a new study suggests. Researchers led by Dr. Emmi Helle of Stanford University in ...

Food Safety Not Always on Menu of TV Cooking Shows

Food Safety Not Always on Menu of TV Cooking Shows0

FRIDAY, Nov. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Safe food-handling procedures are often lacking on TV cooking shows, a new study finds. Researchers at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, said if TV cooks fail to demonstrate safe practices, it ...

Some Primates Have Vision Troubles as They Age

Some Primates Have Vision Troubles as They Age0

TUESDAY, Nov. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Just like humans, some primates start having difficulty seeing things up close as they age. Researchers reviewed photos of 14 wild bonobos as they groomed each other. The primates were between 11 and 45 ...

Follow-Up Appointments Boost Weight-Loss Surgery Success

Follow-Up Appointments Boost Weight-Loss Surgery Success0

"This study shows there is great value in seeing patients at routine intervals after surgery in terms of health outcomes," said study co-author Dr. Andrea Schwoerer. She was at the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University at the time of ...

Sunday's Time Change Offers a Mixed Bag

Sunday's Time Change Offers a Mixed Bag0

FRIDAY, Nov. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When the clocks are turned back one hour on Sunday morning, many will welcome the extra sleep. But some will feel sluggish for the first few days after the time change. And, new research indicates that ...

1 in 4 Seniors Doesn't Discuss End-of-Life Care

1 in 4 Seniors Doesn't Discuss End-of-Life Care0

MONDAY, Oct. 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-quarter of American seniors have never discussed end-of-life care, a new study finds. "Despite decades of work to improve advance care planning, over a quarter of older adults have still ...

Study Questions Use of Migraine Meds in Kids, Teens

Study Questions Use of Migraine Meds in Kids, Teens0

THURSDAY, Oct. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new study raises questions about the effectiveness of medicines commonly prescribed to prevent migraines in children and teens. The 24-week clinical trial involving 328 patients found no significant ...

Study Discounts Myth of 'Patient Zero' in U.S. AIDS Crisis

Study Discounts Myth of 'Patient Zero' in U.S. AIDS Crisis0

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Using genetic analyses of 40-year-old blood samples, scientists have arrived at a clearer understanding of the introduction and spread in North America of the virus that causes AIDS. One myth already ...

Study Links Disasters to Dementia

Study Links Disasters to Dementia0

TUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Earthquakes, floods and other natural disasters may raise dementia risk for seniors forced to leave their homes, a new study suggests. "In the aftermath of disasters, most people focus on mental health ...

'Doc, This Election's Killing Me!'

'Doc, This Election's Killing Me!'0

THURSDAY, Oct. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- As Donald and Hillary duke it out on the campaign trail, Americans are feeling pummeled, too, a new poll finds. The 24/7 coverage of the acrimonious U.S. presidential election has caused stress for ...

Researchers Pinpoint More Genes Linked to Vitiligo

Researchers Pinpoint More Genes Linked to Vitiligo0

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they've identified more genes linked to the autoimmune disease vitiligo, which causes patches of white skin and hair. An international team of scientists pinpointed 23 new locations ...

High-Protein Diets May Not Help Fend Off Diabetes: Study

High-Protein Diets May Not Help Fend Off Diabetes: Study0

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- While many believe that a high-protein diet can help with weight loss, a new study finds it might actually prevent an important health benefit that comes with slimming down. The research found that ...

Chronic Disease in Mom May Be Linked to Newborns' Heart Disease

Chronic Disease in Mom May Be Linked to Newborns' Heart Disease0

TUESDAY, Oct. 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Babies born to mothers with certain chronic diseases may be at increased risk for heart problems, a new study suggests. The analysis included millions of births in Taiwan. The researchers found that ...

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Undiagnosed Eye Problems Pose Risks for Migrant Farm Workers

Undiagnosed Eye Problems Pose Risks for Migrant Farm Workers0

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Vision problems are common among migrant farm workers, but many never get eye exams, a new study shows. Researchers studied 289 Hispanic migrant farm workers in North Carolina who did not use ...

Doctors May Not Be Telling High-Risk Patients About HIV Prevention Drug

Doctors May Not Be Telling High-Risk Patients About HIV Prevention Drug0

MONDAY, Oct. 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many gay and bisexual men don't know about a drug therapy that can protect them from HIV, a new study suggests. A once-a-day pill known as PrEP -- short for pre-exposure prophylaxis medication -- has ...

Study Suggests Genetic Link to Middle Ear Infections

Study Suggests Genetic Link to Middle Ear Infections0

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they've found a potential genetic link to a child's higher risk of middle ear infections. These painful infections are the most frequent reason kids are given antibiotics, according to ...

Study IDs Effective Rx for Burned-Out Doctors

Study IDs Effective Rx for Burned-Out Doctors0

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors who feel burned out don't have to suffer, researchers report. Burnout affects more than half of U.S. doctors, according to the Mayo Clinic researchers. Seeking ways to combat the problem, they ...

Study Questions the No-Sex-Before-Big-Game Advice

Study Questions the No-Sex-Before-Big-Game Advice0

FRIDAY, Oct. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- No matter what your coach tells you, having sex before competition doesn't appear to harm an athlete's performance, Italian researchers say. They reviewed nine studies that examined the impact of sexual ...

Older Surgery Patients Should Be Screened for Frailty: Study

Older Surgery Patients Should Be Screened for Frailty: Study0

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Screening older surgery patients for frailty could improve their outcomes and chances for survival, researchers say. But frailty often goes unrecognized in these patients, according to a study ...

New Clues to Age-Related Hearing Loss

New Clues to Age-Related Hearing Loss0

THURSDAY, Oct. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When background noise makes it hard to carry on a conversation, many older people chalk it up to hearing loss. But a new, small study finds that the problem may not just be in your ear, but also in your ...

Women's Memory Advantage Might Skew Alzheimer's Diagnosis

Women's Memory Advantage Might Skew Alzheimer's Diagnosis0

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease in women may be more difficult than in men because older women tend to retain better verbal memory, according to new research. The findings suggest that memory ...

Better Job Prospects When Young May Pay Off in Better Health

Better Job Prospects When Young May Pay Off in Better Health0

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Living in an area where you can quickly climb the career ladder might pay dividends in boosting your health, a new study suggests. The study finds a strong link between what the researchers call ...

DEA Puts Quota on Production of Opioid Painkillers

DEA Puts Quota on Production of Opioid Painkillers0

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) says it has mandated significant cuts in the production of powerful prescription opioid painkillers. Illegal use of the drugs has helped to fuel the ...

Many Parents Think a Flu Shot Is Unnecessary

Many Parents Think a Flu Shot Is Unnecessary0

TUESDAY, Oct. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Many American parents who don't get their children flu shots say they don't see the need, according to a new study. "The first and most common reason could encompass a belief that risk for contracting ...

Worry About Job Loss May be Linked to Diabetes Risk: Study

Worry About Job Loss May be Linked to Diabetes Risk: Study0

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Workers who feel as if they might lose their job also seem to have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. Researchers reviewed data from nearly 141,000 workers in the United States, ...

Smoking Bans May Keep Young Men From Heavy Smoking

Smoking Bans May Keep Young Men From Heavy Smoking0

FRIDAY, Sept. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking bans may help reduce smoking among young American men, a new study finds. Researchers examined data from more than 4,300 people in 487 cities nationwide who were interviewed annually between ...

New Clues to Sleeping Sickness

New Clues to Sleeping Sickness0

MONDAY, Oct. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Parasites that cause sleeping sickness can be found on the skin of people with no symptoms of the disease, a new study finds. Sleeping sickness affects 4,000 to 8,000 people in sub-Saharan Africa each ...

It May Be Time to Punt on Your Favorite Football Fare

It May Be Time to Punt on Your Favorite Football Fare0

FRIDAY, Sept. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Fried foods and free-flowing beer may be the norm at many football or tailgate parties, but the American Heart Association (AHA) says there are many healthier options. When it comes to meats for the ...

1 in 10 Stroke Rehab Interruptions May Be Preventable

1 in 10 Stroke Rehab Interruptions May Be Preventable0

FRIDAY, Sept. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Interruptions in inpatient rehabilitation occur for some stroke survivors and patients with brain and spinal cord injuries, a new study finds. But at least one-tenth of these treatment breaks could be ...

Making Friends 101: What Works for College Freshmen

Making Friends 101: What Works for College Freshmen0

SUNDAY, Oct. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Personality plays a major role in the ability of new college students to make and maintain friendships, researchers say. To examine how personality affected new friendships, they assessed 273 first-year ...

Knowing Their Breast Cancer Risk May Empower Teens

Knowing Their Breast Cancer Risk May Empower Teens0

THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Knowing they have a family history of breast cancer or a high-risk gene mutation doesn't lead to increased anxiety or depression in teen girls, a new study finds. These teens may actually have ...

Scientists ID Key Fetal Cells Vulnerable to Zika

Scientists ID Key Fetal Cells Vulnerable to Zika0

THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The devastating mosquito-borne Zika virus can infect cells that play a role in skull development, a new study finds. The findings may help explain why Zika infection during pregnancy can lead to ...

Concern About Dialysis Safety Spurs CDC Action

Concern About Dialysis Safety Spurs CDC Action0

THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Steps to reduce bloodstream infections in dialysis patients will be mapped out Thursday at a meeting of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and a coalition of kidney and dialysis ...

Can You Blame Your Headaches on Your Thyroid?

Can You Blame Your Headaches on Your Thyroid?0

THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with migraines and other headache disorders have a greater risk of a thyroid disease known as hypothyroidism, a new study suggests. Hypothyroidism occurs when the body doesn't produce ...

A Happy Spouse May Keep You Healthy

A Happy Spouse May Keep You Healthy0

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Having a happy spouse seems to be good for your health, a new study suggests. The research included nearly 2,000 heterosexual couples between the ages of 50 and 94. Researchers asked about their ...

FDA Asks Public: What Is 'Healthy Food'?

FDA Asks Public: What Is 'Healthy Food'?0

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants Americans to help it clarify the meaning of "healthy" on food labels. The agency is seeking this public input as it redefines nutritional claims on food ...

High Blood Pressure Might Affect Some Kids' Thinking Ability

High Blood Pressure Might Affect Some Kids' Thinking Ability0

THURSDAY, Sept. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure may affect the brains of some children and teens, a new study suggests. Researchers assessed the cognitive (thinking) abilities of 150 youngsters. The kids were between the ages ...

Hot Flashes, Mood Woes?

Hot Flashes, Mood Woes?0

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who believe they have a lot of hot flashes during the night may be more likely to experience mild depression during menopause, a new study suggests. The study included 29 healthy, ...

Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice

Nanoparticles Ease Aching Joints in Mice0

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New research in mice suggests that tiny nanoparticles might one day be a better way to deliver medicine to inflamed joints in humans. The therapy may reduce the risk of osteoarthritis in people who ...

Kidney Stone? Try a Roller Coaster Ride

Kidney Stone? Try a Roller Coaster Ride0

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Anyone who's suffered a kidney stone just wants the urinary obstruction gone. Now, preliminary research suggests relief might even be fun: a roller coaster ride. There's been anecdotal evidence from ...

Your Biological Clock: Why Some Age Faster Than Others

Your Biological Clock: Why Some Age Faster Than Others0

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some adults age faster biologically than others, and may die early even if they have healthy lifestyles, researchers report. The international team of scientists analyzed DNA in blood samples from ...

High Utility Bills Strain More Than the Budget

High Utility Bills Strain More Than the Budget0

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- High utility bills can be more than a budget-buster. They also can cause anxiety and depression in low-income families, a new study finds. The study included 72 families in the Boston area with annual ...

Software Speeds Up Analysis of Breast Cancer Risk: Study

Software Speeds Up Analysis of Breast Cancer Risk: Study0

THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Software that quickly analyzes mammograms and patient history to determine breast cancer risk could save time and reduce unnecessary biopsies, according to the developers of the technology. The ...

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