Daily Health Headlines

Alan Mozes / HealthDay

Alan Mozes wrote these articles for HealthDay. HealthDay provides up to the minute breaking health news.

Sexism Could Harm Men's Health: Study

Sexism Could Harm Men's Health: Study0

Teen 'Choking Game' Played Solo Points to Suicide Risks

Teen 'Choking Game' Played Solo Points to Suicide Risks0

Hi-Tech Skin Patch Might Someday Track Your Health

Hi-Tech Skin Patch Might Someday Track Your Health0

Depression on the Rise Among U.S. Teens, Especially Girls

Depression on the Rise Among U.S. Teens, Especially Girls0

Brain Implant Lets 'Locked-In' ALS Patient Communicate

Brain Implant Lets 'Locked-In' ALS Patient Communicate0

Healthy Living May Mean More Healthy Years for Seniors

Healthy Living May Mean More Healthy Years for Seniors0

Brain Aneurysm: Lack of Awareness Can Cost Lives

Brain Aneurysm: Lack of Awareness Can Cost Lives0

Queen Latifah Puts Heart Failure Center Stage

Queen Latifah Puts Heart Failure Center Stage0

'Entitled' People May Be Pursuing an Unhappy Path

'Entitled' People May Be Pursuing an Unhappy Path0

More Alan Mozes / HealthDay Articles

Homeless, Mentally Ill Youth Benefit From Housing Program

Homeless, Mentally Ill Youth Benefit From Housing Program0

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A subsidized independent-living intervention appears to help homeless young people with mental illness get and keep a roof over their heads, a new Canadian study indicates. Called Housing First, the ...

Always Feeling Lonely? Maybe It's in Your DNA

Always Feeling Lonely? Maybe It's in Your DNA0

MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with a lifelong inclination towards loneliness can probably place at least some of the blame on their genes, a large analysis suggests. The finding stems from a study involving nearly 11,000 men ...

How Much Video Gaming Is Too Much for Kids?

How Much Video Gaming Is Too Much for Kids?0

TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Playing video games might improve a child's motor skills, reaction time and even academic performance, but new research shows that too much gaming can be linked to social and behavioral ...

Shedding Light on Low Male Libido

Shedding Light on Low Male Libido0

TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Light therapy, commonly used to treat seasonal depression, may restore a measure of libido to men who struggle with a low sex drive, a small study suggests. Italian researchers said they found that ...

Could Fish Oil Fatty Acids Raise a Woman's Risk for Diabetes?

Could Fish Oil Fatty Acids Raise a Woman's Risk for Diabetes?0

FRIDAY, Sept. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women who consume high amounts of meat, fish, eggs and other common foods rich in several different types of fatty acids may end up facing a greater risk for type 2 diabetes, a large and long-term French ...

Diet or Exercise: What's Best for the Middle-Aged Heart

Diet or Exercise: What's Best for the Middle-Aged Heart0

THURSDAY, Sept. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- If you're a middle-aged couch potato in serious need of boosting your heart health, is it better to exercise or diet? New research says dieting, exercising or a combination of the two can all get the ...

Makeup of Germs in Newborn's Gut May Triple Allergy, Asthma Risk

Makeup of Germs in Newborn's Gut May Triple Allergy, Asthma Risk0

TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A relatively rare abnormality in the makeup of germs in an infant's gut may triple the risk for allergies and asthma in childhood, new research warns. Millions of bacteria and fungi can be found in ...

Fruits, Veggies Powerful Rx for Kidney Disease: Study

Fruits, Veggies Powerful Rx for Kidney Disease: Study0

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney disease patients who eat three to four more servings of fruits and vegetables every day could lower their blood pressure and nearly halve their medication costs, new research suggests. The ...

COPD Deaths Down for Most Americans: CDC

COPD Deaths Down for Most Americans: CDC0

THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer Americans are dying from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but not black women and the middle-aged, a new government report shows. Between 2000 and 2014, there was a 12 percent ...

Could Good Sex Be Bad for an Older Man's Heart?

Could Good Sex Be Bad for an Older Man's Heart?0

TUESDAY, Sept. 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sexually active older men may be more likely to have a heart attack, heart failure or stroke compared with their less lusty peers, new research suggests. What's more, older men who say they enjoy ...

Parents' Psychiatric Issues May Adversely Affect Some Children

Parents' Psychiatric Issues May Adversely Affect Some Children0

THURSDAY, Sept. 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some children of parents with a history of psychiatric illness may be at higher risk for attempting suicide and/or engaging in violent behavior, a new Danish study suggests. Danes born to parents who ...

First Days of Preseason Practice Pose Big Heat Risks for College Football Players

First Days of Preseason Practice Pose Big Heat Risks for College Football Players0

FRIDAY, Aug. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- As college football players trade in their beach towels for helmets and padding, new research shows their risk of developing sports-related heat illness shoots up. In particular, during the first 14 ...

'Business Diet' a Bad Deal for the Heart

'Business Diet' a Bad Deal for the Heart0

FRIDAY, Aug. 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The typical "social business diet" -- heavy on red meats, sweet drinks, processed snacks and booze -- takes a toll on the heart, a new study finds. In the go-go world of business meetings and nonstop ...

Will 'Unloading' Shoes Help Your Arthritic Knees?

Will 'Unloading' Shoes Help Your Arthritic Knees?0

FRIDAY, Aug. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For reducing pain from arthritic knees, "unloading" shoes don't offer a leg up over conventional walking shoes, new research indicates. With their modified midsoles, unloading shoes aim to reduce the ...

Why Kicking the Opioid Habit Can Be So Tough

Why Kicking the Opioid Habit Can Be So Tough0

WEDNESDAY, July 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- He was 26, a specialist fifth class with the U.S. Army, and stationed abroad, when an accident on the German autobahn sent him careening through the windshield of his car. The now 60-year-old veteran ...

Another STD Spurs Concern

Another STD Spurs Concern0

FRIDAY, Feb. 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There's yet another sexually transmitted infection that doctors and patients need to watch out for -- Mycoplasma genitalium. New research from England adds to evidence that the bacteria Mycoplasma ...

New Drug Shows Promise Against Severe Sinusitis

New Drug Shows Promise Against Severe Sinusitis0

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug for the treatment of nasal polyps has shown promise in a small, preliminary trial involving a group of patients struggling with chronic sinusitis. Dupilumab, which is injected, is ...

Simple Blood Test May Predict a Blood Cancer's Return

Simple Blood Test May Predict a Blood Cancer's Return0

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- British researchers say a simple blood test may be a cheap, easy and effective way to spot risk of recurrence of a common form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This type of AML is characterized by a ...

Parental Debt May Affect Kids' Behavior

Parental Debt May Affect Kids' Behavior0

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The type of debt parents accrue might affect their child's behavior -- for better or worse, new research suggests. Mortgages fall in the plus column, meaning they're positively linked to a child's ...

Catch-Up Sleep May Reverse Type 2 Diabetes Risk Tied to Sleep Loss: Study

Catch-Up Sleep May Reverse Type 2 Diabetes Risk Tied to Sleep Loss: Study0

MONDAY, Jan. 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Though prior research warns that sleep deprivation may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests that "catch-up" sleep might reverse that risk -- at least in the ...

College Football Player's Autopsy May Offer Clues to Brain Trauma

College Football Player's Autopsy May Offer Clues to Brain Trauma0

MONDAY, Jan. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Former Missouri State linebacker Michael Keck quit football after three years of Division 1 play and might have faded into obscurity. But his death at age 25, in 2013, has opened a window on a poorly ...

All High-Risk Patients Should Get Blood Pressure Meds: Study

All High-Risk Patients Should Get Blood Pressure Meds: Study0

THURSDAY, Dec. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People known to be at high risk for a heart attack or stroke should be given blood pressure-lowering medications no matter their blood pressure level, new research suggests. Current protocols ...

Sudden Cardiac Arrest May Not Be So Sudden

Sudden Cardiac Arrest May Not Be So Sudden0

MONDAY, Dec. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Sudden cardiac arrest may not be as sudden as doctors have thought, researchers report. Roughly half of cardiac arrest patients experience telltale warning signs that their heart is in danger of ...

Kids Find Help for Anorexia More Often Than 'Pro-Ana' Posts on YouTube

Kids Find Help for Anorexia More Often Than 'Pro-Ana' Posts on YouTube0

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- For years, people surfing YouTube may have accidently or intentionally encountered so-called "pro-ana" videos extolling the virtues of a deadly disease: anorexia. But a new Norwegian study finds that ...

Shingles Linked to Raised Heart Risks for Seniors, Study Finds

Shingles Linked to Raised Heart Risks for Seniors, Study Finds0

TUESDAY, Dec. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors who develop the painful rash known as shingles appear to face a short-term increase in their risk for having a stroke or heart attack, new research indicates. The finding was based on the ...

Are British Teeth Really Worse Than American Teeth?

Are British Teeth Really Worse Than American Teeth?0

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although British teeth have long been a subject of satire in the United States, a new stereotype-busting study is giving the British a little something to smile about. Researchers have found evidence ...

Shingles Linked to Raised Heart Risks for Seniors, Study Finds

Shingles Linked to Raised Heart Risks for Seniors, Study Finds0

TUESDAY, Dec. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors who develop the painful rash known as shingles appear to face a short-term increase in their risk for having a stroke or heart attack, new research indicates. The finding was based on the ...

Could a Scan Someday Replace Lymph Node Biopsy?

Could a Scan Someday Replace Lymph Node Biopsy?0

THURSDAY, Dec. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists are testing a noninvasive alternative to lymph node biopsy for detecting early signs that melanoma skin cancer has spread. Patients currently undergo surgical removal, often involving a ...

Could a Scan Someday Replace Lymph Node Biopsy?

Could a Scan Someday Replace Lymph Node Biopsy?0

THURSDAY, Dec. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists are testing a noninvasive alternative to lymph node biopsy for detecting early signs that melanoma skin cancer has spread. Patients currently undergo surgical removal, often involving a ...

Talk Therapy, Antidepressants Offer Similar Results for Major Depression

Talk Therapy, Antidepressants Offer Similar Results for Major Depression0

TUESDAY, Dec. 8, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Talk therapy and antidepressants could both be equally effective as stand-alone treatments for major depressive disorder, new research indicates. A review of 11 previously conducted studies that ...

More Alan Mozes / HealthDay Articles

Could Dim View on Aging Raise Your Alzheimer's Risk?

Could Dim View on Aging Raise Your Alzheimer's Risk?0

MONDAY, Dec. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Young and middle-aged adults who harbor negative thoughts about aging may face a higher risk for Alzheimer's disease decades later, new research suggests. The investigation compared early attitudes on ...

Could There Be a 'Quit-Smoking' Gene?

Could There Be a 'Quit-Smoking' Gene?0

THURSDAY, Dec. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Some smokers have much more difficulty kicking the habit than others. Now, a new review of prior research identifies a potential culprit: genes. Researchers analyzed genetic differences cited in 22 ...

Crave Coffee Too Much? Talk Therapy May Help

Crave Coffee Too Much? Talk Therapy May Help0

MONDAY, Dec. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A short round of "talk-therapy" seems to help over-consumers of caffeine dramatically cut back their intake, a small new study suggests. Caffeine-use disorder, though not yet an official mental health ...

Possible New Weight-Loss Tool: Blocking Stomach Artery

Possible New Weight-Loss Tool: Blocking Stomach Artery0

TUESDAY, Dec. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A technique already used in the emergency room may have new potential as a minimally invasive treatment for morbid obesity, preliminary findings suggest. The procedure, called gastric artery ...

New 'Collar' Aims to Help Shield Brain From Concussion

New 'Collar' Aims to Help Shield Brain From Concussion0

FRIDAY, Nov. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new type a lightweight and pressurized neck collar may help prevent mild concussions during sports, according to the developers of the device. The collar, which weighs four to five ounces -- is ...

Almost 1 in 10 Americans Has Lifelong Drug Problem

Almost 1 in 10 Americans Has Lifelong Drug Problem0

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one in 10 Americans has some type of lifelong drug use disorder, a new federal government survey finds. But only a quarter of them get the treatment they need, researchers said. The ...

U.S. Adult Smoking Rate Falls to New Low

U.S. Adult Smoking Rate Falls to New Low0

THURSDAY, Nov. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Fewer Americans smoke than a decade ago, and those who still light up do so less often, federal health officials reported Thursday. Less than 17 percent of adults said they smoked in 2014, down from ...

Swiss Report Highlights Danger of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

Swiss Report Highlights Danger of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis0

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new report on a patient in Switzerland who nearly died after catching a highly drug-resistant strain of tuberculosis illustrates exactly what public health officials around the world fear ...

'Balloon-in-a-Pill' May Be New Weight-Loss Weapon

'Balloon-in-a-Pill' May Be New Weight-Loss Weapon0

THURSDAY, Nov. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Could losing weight ever be as easy as swallowing a pill? Preliminary research suggests the answer may very well be yes. Testing is underway to assess the potential of a gastric balloon that's packed ...

'Balloon-in-a-Pill' May Be New Weight-Loss Weapon

'Balloon-in-a-Pill' May Be New Weight-Loss Weapon0

THURSDAY, Nov. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Could losing weight ever be as easy as swallowing a pill? Preliminary research suggests the answer may very well be yes. Testing is underway to assess the potential of a gastric balloon that's packed ...

Online Psychotherapy May Help Some With Emotional Problems

Online Psychotherapy May Help Some With Emotional Problems0

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Internet has made it possible for people to work and study from home, and new research suggests that a staple of mental health care may also be headed to a computer near you. Cognitive behavioral ...

Gonorrhea Becoming More Resistant to One Antibiotic: CDC

Gonorrhea Becoming More Resistant to One Antibiotic: CDC0

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- One of several antibiotic treatment options for the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea seems to be losing its effectiveness, U.S. health officials warn in a new report. The U.S. Centers for Disease ...

Online Psychotherapy May Help Some With Emotional Problems

Online Psychotherapy May Help Some With Emotional Problems0

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Internet has made it possible for people to work and study from home, and new research suggests that a staple of mental health care may also be headed to a computer near you. Cognitive behavioral ...

Face-lifts Seem to Do Little to Boost Self-Esteem: Study

Face-lifts Seem to Do Little to Boost Self-Esteem: Study0

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Face-lifts may smooth away years from a person's appearance, but they seem to do little to boost self-esteem, new research suggests. In the small study, the researchers looked at what 50 patients -- ...

E-Cigarette Use Highest Among Young Adults, U.S. Report Finds

E-Cigarette Use Highest Among Young Adults, U.S. Report Finds0

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In a first-of-its-kind look at electronic cigarettes, a new U.S. government study reports that nearly 13 percent of American adults have tried e-cigarettes at least once and almost 4 percent use ...

Ex-NFL Star Helps Spread the Word on Risks Posed by Painkillers

Ex-NFL Star Helps Spread the Word on Risks Posed by Painkillers0

FRIDAY, Oct. 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- During his 12 seasons as a fullback with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 6-foot-1, 250-pound Mike Alstott was known as "The A-Train" -- a punishing runner and blocker and fan favorite. From 1996 to 2007, ...

Face-lifts Seem to Do Little to Boost Self-Esteem: Study

Face-lifts Seem to Do Little to Boost Self-Esteem: Study0

THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Face-lifts may smooth away years from a person's appearance, but they seem to do little to boost self-esteem, new research suggests. In the small study, the researchers looked at what 50 patients -- ...

How Cancer Wreaks Havoc on Family Finances

How Cancer Wreaks Havoc on Family Finances0

MONDAY, Oct. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A cancer diagnosis exacts an enormous toll on a person's health, and new research says it can also devastate a patient's ability to continue working and maintain financial stability. During the years ...

'Older' Blood Poses No Harm to Heart Surgery Patients: Study

'Older' Blood Poses No Harm to Heart Surgery Patients: Study0

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- 'Older' blood is just as safe for heart patients as transfusions of fresher blood, a new study shows. Researchers in Sweden found that heart surgery patients given blood stored for more than six weeks ...

'Older' Blood Poses No Harm to Heart Surgery Patients: Study

'Older' Blood Poses No Harm to Heart Surgery Patients: Study0

TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- 'Older' blood is just as safe for heart patients as transfusions of fresher blood, a new study shows. Researchers in Sweden found that heart surgery patients given blood stored for more than six weeks ...

Men's Health Supplements Don't Benefit Prostate Cancer Patients: Study

Men's Health Supplements Don't Benefit Prostate Cancer Patients: Study0

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study finds no evidence that men's health supplements help prostate cancer patients. Although popular, such supplements do not appear to lower the risk for experiencing radiation treatment side ...

Men's Health Supplements Don't Benefit Prostate Cancer Patients: Study

Men's Health Supplements Don't Benefit Prostate Cancer Patients: Study0

MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study finds no evidence that men's health supplements help prostate cancer patients. Although popular, such supplements do not appear to lower the risk for experiencing radiation treatment side ...

Study Links Flu Vaccine to Short-Term Drop in Stroke Risk

Study Links Flu Vaccine to Short-Term Drop in Stroke Risk0

THURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- With flu season underway, many people will choose to be vaccinated, in the hopes of warding off a debilitating bout of fever, sneezes, coughs and aches. But a new British study suggests they may end ...

Ebola Persists for Extended Period in Survivors' Semen: Study

Ebola Persists for Extended Period in Survivors' Semen: Study0

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The Ebola virus is capable of hiding out in the semen of male survivors for up to nine months after symptoms appear, a new study suggests. And a related case report illustrates why this latest ...

As HIV Patients Live Longer, Certain Cancer Risks Rise: Study

As HIV Patients Live Longer, Certain Cancer Risks Rise: Study0

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Antiretroviral therapy has extended the lives of people with HIV, but living longer may increase these patients' risk for certain cancers. A study of nearly 90,000 HIV patients revealed a rise in three ...

Implanted Device May Help Ease Sleep Apnea, Small Study Shows

Implanted Device May Help Ease Sleep Apnea, Small Study Shows0

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An implantable pacemaker-like device might improve sleep patterns and quality of life for people with sleep apnea, a new study contends. The treatment, called cranial nerve stimulation, is designed to ...

New Technology Tests Tumors Inside the Patient to Find Best Treatment

New Technology Tests Tumors Inside the Patient to Find Best Treatment0

WEDNESDAY, April 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two new devices may eventually lead to more accurate, less toxic methods of predicting how well a specific cancer drug might work on an individual's cancer, researchers report. The goal: to ...

Many Young Adults With Autism Face Unemployment, Isolation

Many Young Adults With Autism Face Unemployment, Isolation0

TUESDAY, April 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As children with autism grow older, many approach adulthood without continued access to the kind of special needs services they routinely received as children, a new report warns. The "National Autism ...

Could Taking Acetaminophen Dull Your Happiness?

Could Taking Acetaminophen Dull Your Happiness?0

WEDNESDAY, April 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen, the painkiller best known to Americans as Tylenol, may do more than simply dull pain -- it may also dull happy or sad emotions, new research finds. The new, small study is the first ...

Obesity Linked to Greater Risk of Prostate Cancer in Blacks, Study Says

Obesity Linked to Greater Risk of Prostate Cancer in Blacks, Study Says0

THURSDAY, April 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer than whites, and for obese black men, their risk can quadruple as their weight goes up, a new study indicates. The findings from this large ...

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